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Why Don’t You Kill Yourself.

March 19, 2013

euthanasia_billboard1-420x0

The euthanasia debate has reignited with Tasmania’s State Parliament due to debate new legislation in favour of euthanasia later this year.

If passed, the new laws will make Tasmania the first state in Australia to give advanced terminally ill patients the opportunity to take their own lives.

However the move has divided the community with Greens advocates denouncing those attempting to block the voluntary euthanasia laws while Tasmanian President of the Australian Medical Association calls the push “support for capital punishment.”

The NSW Greens say people whose religious views are blocking voluntary euthanasia laws are making the lives of vulnerable people even more wretched and should butt out.

“It’s time they recognised they are in the minority and got out of the way,” Greens MP Cate Faehrmann said.

The latest Greens campaign features a video of Loredana Alessio-Mulhall, who is in the advanced stages of multiple sclerosis and wants law reform so she can die at a time of her choosing.

“She represents a growing movement of people who are experiencing first-hand how cruel our laws can be,” Ms Faehrmann said in a statement.

“Loredana is given every assistance to live an increasingly undignified life, yet society is turning its back on her when all she is asking for is the right to die with dignity.”

Ms Faehrmann said Ms Alessio-Mulhall could not take her own life because she had lost the use of her limbs.

And if a loved one assists her to die they could be tried for manslaughter or murder.

“There could not be a more stark example of how unjust and senseless the law is in this area,” she said.

“It’s time those people with strong religious views who are blocking the passage of voluntary euthanasia laws recognise their views are making some very vulnerable people’s lives even more wretched.”

However, the Australian Medical Association’s John Davis says doctors are vehemently against the plan.

“I’m not sure that the majority of doctors, if in fact any doctors, would want to euthanase people, and that’s not being taken into account,” he said.

“The Premier and the leader of the Greens have been so contemptuous, they’ve not even consulted the profession.”

“Being really blunt, this is legislation for state-sanctioned murder and the last one of those in Australia was in 1964.”

State and federal parliaments have refused at least four attempts to legalise euthanasia in recent years.

What do you think, are you in favour of euthanasia or against…?

 

 

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38 Comments leave one →
  1. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:33 am

    I reserve the right to have myself put down, should I determine that that is the best & most dignified course of action.

    I couldn’t give a fuck whether or not the government of the day agrees.

    Unfortunately, the way things currently stand, this leaves my mercykiller open to legal reprisals.

    My life is mine own. It is not a possession of the State.

    I am yet to here a credible argument against euthanasia…& I reckon I’ve heard most of them. Also, I am very closely acquainted with someone in a position whereby they are faced with such risks & decisions on a regular basis.

    I believe it can be made ‘workable’, with appropriate oversight.

    Forcing people to keep ‘being alive’ (as opposed to actually living ) is inhumane & overreach.

  2. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:34 am

    * hear a credible…

  3. March 19, 2013 11:36 am

    My late father died from MS, or more correctly when he developed pneumonia the nursing home where he was being cared for sent him to the P A hospital and there he refused treatment even though he knew that he would die as a result. I have the greatest respect when someone wishes to die to end their suffering from a horrible terminal condition but the idea of legalised euthanasia worries me far more than the idea that anyone may have to endure a lingering death.
    In most cases those who wish to kill themselves can do so, a deliberate overdose, a handy plastic bag or just refusal of food and water will do it, most people would be amazed how easy it is to kill yourself.
    Making it hard for others to help you is actually one of the important safeguards against being murdered or coerced into an early departure and frankly of someone you love is begging you to help them end their life then a stretch for that act of kindness is a small price to pay for love and certain proof that you did not kill for any base reason.

  4. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:38 am

    “people whose religious views are blocking voluntary euthanasia laws are making the lives of vulnerable people even more wretched and should butt out.”

    Strongly agree.

    “the Australian Medical Association’s John Davis says doctors are vehemently against the plan.”

    I know for a fact that that is a gigantic, incorrect generalisation. John Davis doesn’t speak for all doctors on this issue.
    At the moment, compassionate doctors are left vulnerable to the law.

  5. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:40 am

    “but the idea of legalised euthanasia worries me far more than the idea that anyone may have to endure a lingering death.”

    And I say, it’s not your fucking business to impose your own sensibilities upon the life of others.

    How big of you to sentence them to suffering so that your conscience can remain placated.

  6. March 19, 2013 11:45 am

    toiletcontents

    I’ve been there, twice, and frankly its not as simple as you think. I take it that you are in good health yourself so your position is essentially theoretical?

  7. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:55 am

    I have been there multiple times with family members.

    Me personally, yes, I am in good health…still being under 40.

    I never said it was ‘simple’. In fact, I am in a position, which I’m not willing to disclose, to see firsthand the impact upon all of those involved in the equation; not just the ‘ailed’.

    I still think it should be a fundamental right of the individual to choose euthanasia, or not.

    I recognise that it is a ‘difficult’ & emotive issue (hence my colourful language) & that not all opposition to it is based upon religious beliefs.

    Being in good health now, isn’t relevant as to whether I may want the option in the future, or not.

  8. Ol' Sancty permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:57 am

    I think they’re fine, as long as they stay in bloody Asia…….

  9. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 11:59 am

    * boom, tish!

  10. March 19, 2013 12:04 pm

    As I said in my first comment I watched may father decide to die and saw that his wishes were respected. To be honest I think that a great deal of the push for euthanasia comes form distressed relatives who want things neat, tidy and clean and death like birth is often anything but that. Further I think that cultural prohibitions against suicide are in play here as well and that many of the ill who can kill themselves want to delegate their end to others as a result, or they want to short circuit their own potential to change their mind.

    Oh and BTW my concerns are not for religious reasons at all

  11. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 12:09 pm

    I am aware of your non-religious persuasion, Iain.

  12. Ol' Sancty permalink
    March 19, 2013 12:12 pm

    It’s a difficult question made more difficult my advancements in medicine.

    On balance I think there can be reasonable laws drafted which reflect the current practice of administering pain relief for patient comfort which also has the effect of hastening death in special circumstances. I also think the right to refuse medical treatment is already law, at least in Victoria.

    I wouldn’t want to see a situation where doctors are forced to actively participate as has become law in relation to abortion in Victoria.

  13. March 19, 2013 12:12 pm

    OK glad to hear that 😉

  14. Ol' Sancty permalink
    March 19, 2013 12:14 pm

    * boom, tish!

    I should add that was shamelessly stolen from that bloke who plays Borat, Sacha Baron Cohen in a show he first did the name of which escapes me.

  15. March 19, 2013 12:16 pm

    Yeah Ol’ Sancty the obligations such changes might impose on doctors is another issue to consider. Its one thing for someone to do the deed as an act of love but what of the effect on professionals who may be asked to kill as if is just another day at the office?
    That is too big an ask in my opinion.

  16. March 19, 2013 12:17 pm

    Ali G???

  17. TB Queensland permalink
    March 19, 2013 12:18 pm

    It could be possible to conduct euthenasia “tastefully” … there is a “classic” model …

  18. March 19, 2013 12:19 pm

    In my experience up here (in Queensland) doctors et al are happy to accept “do not resuscitate” instructions in most cases.

  19. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 12:54 pm

    It needn’t be as brutal as ‘do not resuscitate’.

    There are ways & means of making it far more pain free & dignified. Snacty alludes to these in his above comment.

    I also agree that health professionals shouldn’t be compelled to act against their conscience when it comes to euthanasia.

    The choice however, should be on the table for all individuals.

  20. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 12:58 pm

    “what of the effect on professionals who may be asked to kill as if is just another day at the office?”

    Conversely, what of the effect on professionals who know the will of their patient to die with dignity, without discomfort & at the time of their choice? Right now, they must endure the ghastly lingering demise of the patient (against the patient’s will), knowing that they could ease their exit, but may not…as if is just another day at the office.

  21. TB Queensland permalink
    March 19, 2013 1:16 pm

    Having watched my father rattle his way to death with emphysema … in palliative care … I can assure you there is a need for euthanasia …

    I suspect that many who wish for it, cannot express that wish, through illness such as dementia …

  22. March 19, 2013 1:21 pm

    “The choice however, should be on the table for all individuals.”

    Agreed…!

  23. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 1:31 pm

    “I suspect that many who wish for it, cannot express that wish, through illness such as dementia …”

    Absolutely, TB. I think it’s something the individual needs to give serious consideration to, prior to discussing it with close family & trusted friends…& impressing upon them precisely what stance one holds for themself.
    In most cases, I’d think the family would want to follow through with what they know to be the individual’s wishes. If the individual hasn’t made such wishes known, it places an unfair burden on loved ones who will feel compelled to make a decision one way or the other; for an individual who can no longer acknowledge in the affirmative for themself.

  24. toiletcontents permalink
    March 19, 2013 1:34 pm

    Stroke, is particularly heinous, imo.

    Often rendering the individual incapable of communicating their wishes. Effectively trapping a mind within the prison of its derelict body.

    Lethal cocktail for me, thanks.

  25. el gordo permalink
    March 19, 2013 2:19 pm

    ‘Lethal cocktail for me, thanks.’

    Die with dignity.

  26. el gordo permalink
    March 19, 2013 3:57 pm

    To which I’ll add… my mum had Alzheimer’s Disease for eight years before she died. It was a devastating experience for my dad.

    In a saner world this slow degradation could have been avoided, I know she would have preferred a quick exit.

  27. 2DT Shock Jock permalink
    March 19, 2013 4:00 pm

    “Lethal cocktail for me, thanks.”

    Have you run out of your $2 Reds ?

  28. Meta permalink
    March 19, 2013 4:37 pm

    (I still reckon there’s something slightly unnerving about a dying parental unit waking up on day 3-of-5 of self-determined terminal palliative care to demand hot, crinkle-cut chips and rugby on telly, because someone forgot to top-up their stay-asleep-and-relatively-pain-unaware-until-life-cessation meds. Not that day 5’s prolonged death-rattle wasn’t mildly disturbing, too.

    Then again, I’ve never had a pet put down in the absence of catastrophic trauma, because it’s not my decision to make in the natural order of things, and because a pet lacks relevant agency to rearrange that order.

    So, between the two notions, and another instance of a grandparent accidentally overdosing a couple of times, without ultimate success in whatever they were accidentally hoping to achieve, I guess my naive position is that effective euthanasia (should) be (made) available to those who could and would choose it.)

  29. el gordo permalink
    March 19, 2013 4:39 pm

    Yes.

  30. TB Queensland permalink
    March 19, 2013 4:48 pm

    That’s extremely lucid, M! 😯

    I only needed to read it once!

    But well put …

  31. March 19, 2013 4:54 pm

    @post ” are you in favour of (voluntary) euthanasia or against.? “
    Yep, in favor of VE for pretty much what Dunny has said. l added voluntary in brackets above, as in each adult choosing `only` for them-self, not child, parent or spouse, as this is the gaps that teabags have been able to use to destroy the VE position. Just as an FYI, l am pretty sure the NT was the 1st in the world to have VE legalised, but John-W`s teabag regime stomped his jack-boot on the NT`s neck.

  32. March 19, 2013 5:18 pm

    I think that voluntary euthanasia is a no-brainer.

    Now, as for “mandatory” euthanasia, I’d like to see that.

    Catching Up springs to mind as in ideal candidate.

  33. 2DT Shock Jock permalink
    March 19, 2013 5:42 pm

    “I’ve never had a pet put down in the absence of catastrophic trauma, ……….”

    Tell me about………..

    When that happened to us about 3 years ago the “catastrophic trauma” arrived in the form of the Vet’s invoice for the pelvic surgery required to avoid the cat becoming a fatal victim of severe rubber poisoning ……………..meaning it got run over.

  34. 2DT Shock Jock permalink
    March 19, 2013 5:43 pm

    “Catching Up springs to mind as in ideal candidate.”

    But I thought it was already brain dead……….!

  35. public toilet permalink
    March 19, 2013 5:48 pm

    😯

  36. el gordo permalink
    March 19, 2013 5:52 pm

    🙂

  37. Ol' Sancty permalink
    March 19, 2013 10:12 pm

    do not resuscitate

    I am the younger of twins and my father told the story at my 21st of the decision which had to be made…..”to resuscitate or not….”

    Then my uncle yelled out “you should have resuscitated”.

    Fkn smart arse.

  38. TB Queensland permalink
    March 19, 2013 10:28 pm

    Jame’s, uncle sounds noice …

    FMD! There’s TWO!

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