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But It’s Different Now

July 29, 2013

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The challenge facing most young people today is the gut-wrenching desire to be themselves while at the same time struggling to “fit in” within  the expectations of others.

This hasn’t changed for centuries.

 

 

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26 Comments leave one →
  1. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 7:23 am

    Do many of us know who we are? I am amused that many young folk all end up looking the same in their quest for difference. Tattoos. Nose rings. Tongue studs. Fluoro hair.

    Tatty.

    Where are the magnificent Mohawks of decades past? They were a work of art, art deco. They always reminded me of the silver scalloped comb atop my fav building, the Chrysler in New York. The Mohawk tribe had panache. They were in uniform: slim leathers, lots of silver, clunky/lean boots but they successfully badged themselves as individuals. It came from within. They had kavorka.

    Most of us drag about following the leader. All in uniform. Boat shoes. Blue blazers and chinos. A little more latitude for the ladies.

    What I hate now is state imposed sameness. National curricula. Testing to provide marketable outcomes for schools. Disturbingly too there are tests at health centre and kindergarten levels. The parents of any little mite who cannot use scissors or ride a bike, among other things, are likely to be told their child could be ‘on the spectrum’ for autism.

    We are such crushing conformists in this land. Does anyone agree with me? I hope not. I like to have my own thoughts.

  2. armchair opinionator permalink
    July 30, 2013 9:46 am

    I think a lot of what you are objecting to [I may be wrong] is the complete americanisation corporatisation of australia by stealth. You don’t hear of it much, not written about in the papers, but aussie is all the way with the USA. Corporations rule the world, they like everyone to be the same, everyone must fit in with the objectives, goal and image.

    Not only do the kids want to be different, many parents are nutjobs full of anxiety, and depression and are too busy chasing their fortunes to be responsible parents ‘different’. I’m not so worried about the state controlled sameness as the ones who wish to be outside the state control – the home schooling because of religious nutjobbery and control/ownership of child, the no-immunisation nutjobs or the fringe people determined to have their lunatic beliefs seen as mainstream and become state sponsored/funded.

    We are such crushing conformists in this land.

    Aussie spirit? What happened? The road to serfdom has become a high speed highway. We are a nation of serfs, we happily bend to the will of the masters, never kick up a fuss, do as we are told, always accept and never question authority. If you don’t like it there is always substance abuse, why hasn’t someone got to legalise and control that yet? A nice little earner!

    The men get all macho about ‘uppity’ women yet spend their lives in dull and dreary forelock tugging serfdom, the women strive to compete, find out it’s all a crock and spend their lives in misery.

    yep, living the dream!

  3. TB Queensland permalink
    July 30, 2013 9:49 am

    Here’s a world changer … that’ll bugger up a few catliks …

    http://www.news.com.au/world-news/pope-francis-says-he-wont-judge-priests-for-being-gay-as-he-returns-from-brazil/story-fndir2ev-1226687806050

    +++++++++++++++++++++++

    National curricula(sic)

    A National Curriculum is a necessity for teachers, parents, children and any other stake holders in how children learn … especially for those families who move and live across state boundaries (Defence Force and mining personnel spring immediately to mind).

    Its just a pity that we don’t have one … what is passed off as a National Curriculum is a rather sad joke …

  4. TB Queensland permalink
    July 30, 2013 9:54 am

    We are a nation of serfs,

    We’ve become a nation of smart phone (what an oxymoron) surfers, KL, that probably accounts for “conformity” … the bills some people rack up are horrendous … as the mortgage payments slip … ’tis a “now” society like never before …

  5. Splatterbottom permalink
    July 30, 2013 10:21 am

    “I am amused that many young folk all end up looking the same in their quest for difference. Tattoos. Nose rings. Tongue studs. Fluoro hair.”

    The classic example of this was the Triple J logo of 20 odd years ago. It was a sheep with a few trendy accouterments. But still a sheep.

  6. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 10:27 am

    Armchair your words resonate however I am now convinced that people want to be different as long as it is like everyone else. Kids have their stuffing knocked out early. They are slaves to The Brand. And I am more concerned about state sponsored conformity than a few ‘nutjobs’ who won’t vaccinate their kids. I have a more open mind on home schooling based on a tiny sample. My cousin home-schooled her four at early primary school level. All four went on to excel academically and become very fine musicians. Of course the parents were clever. Makes a big difference. Agree with you 100 per cent about Aussie spirit although I am beginning to think it may have been little more than bad manners. It has certainly fled the scene.

    TB I absolutely hate the idea of a national curriculum. Yet another example of that word Choice being little more than propaganda.

  7. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 10:29 am

    Excellent logo sB. Enjoyed it.

  8. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 10:32 am

    Armchair I should clarify that I agree with your view on corporatisation. Globalization is its friendly public face: as in humanity together. Bah humbug.

  9. TB Queensland permalink
    July 30, 2013 11:00 am

    TB I absolutely hate the idea of a national curriculum. Yet another example of that word Choice being little more than propaganda.

    I’d argue the point if I could see one … 🙄

    We could always give kids a choice of going to school or not?

  10. armchair opinionator permalink
    July 30, 2013 11:16 am

    We could always give kids a choice of going to school or not?

    Education is a national investment. A national curriculum should be in place, eduction should be free to all and paid for by our taxes. If people want private choice, want to go outside the public system, they should be prepared to pay for it themselves. If the taxes that now support private schools were given back to public education, we would have a world class system. Private choice should not be taxpayer subsidised, private enterprise should stand and fall on it’s own merits.

  11. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 11:17 am

    What I mean is we are always told that Choice is something mighty fine in a democracy and yet we are seeing less of it. The national curriculum will lessen choice and increase homogeneity. And teachers are already teaching to the Naplan test. Apparently there is a multi million dollar industry now which provides tutors and written material to help each child absorb what every other child his or her age is absorbing. I saw a whole stack of such glossy booklets for sale in a shop recently.

  12. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 11:19 am

    Armchair, I agree with you about the need for equal opportunity for all provided by an excellent state school system but I do not support a bational curriculum whic will be imposed on both state and private schools.

  13. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 11:20 am

    I am not talking about funding arrangements but subject choice, pure and simple.

  14. armchair opinionator permalink
    July 30, 2013 11:27 am

    The national curriculum will lessen choice and increase homogeneity.

    Would any of this choice be evidence based and world’s best practice or just what we think is a good idea?

  15. TB Queensland permalink
    July 30, 2013 12:44 pm

    .. there is a multi million dollar industry …

    That’s a whole new playground, Di … teaching is in crisis right across the board, from the university teachers colleges (and lack of realistic curriculum, staff and methodology) to the schools and the management of them … school principals are promoted via Peter’s Principle … non are trained in management a totally different profession to pedagogy …

    BTW, Di … My cousin home-schooled her four at early primary school level. All four went on to excel academically … and your cousin would have had to have “passed” tests according to circumstance and ability to do that and he/she would have needed to follow a curriculum and demonstrate some learning outcomes for the children at the very least … curriculums are not new … I just wish they would embrace competency based learning rather than promotion by age …

    An issue of concern for many in the field of learning at home is the lack of interaction with other children particularly in the formative years …

    As an adult learning facilitator I can tell you that learning is more effective (the quality and the quantity) for adults who learn in groups than as individuals … (the ideal, I believe from personal experience, is in groups of three) …

    People learn best by doing … (as opposed to just listening … )

  16. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 1:12 pm

    Most interested in what you have written TB. I am sure you are right about the social interaction importance for children. I don’t know about world’s best practice Armchair. I don’ t know what that is. I know Frenchmen are more charming than Aussie blokes and that French women must hold the world’s best practice award when it comes to style. An educated Scots voice is best for talking about bridges, only Asians should be heart surgeons, the instruments they use should be German. The Czechs should never be allowed near a kitchen. And I am always relieved when I hear an English/Australian/Kiwi accent coming out of the cockpit at take off time.

  17. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    July 30, 2013 1:31 pm

    That is very funny Dianne, because it is so true.

  18. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 1:32 pm

    Yes it is true Tom. Glad you smiled.

  19. armchair opinionator permalink
    July 30, 2013 1:43 pm

    hehe, I like your style dianne!

    People learn best by doing … (as opposed to just listening … )

    Just going by my own studies, I’ve learned that individuals have individual learning styles and needs, that they also learn at different paces. There can be auditory [hearing, sharing experiences], visual [pictures, video, demonstrations] and kinaesthetic [doing, practising, feedback demonstration].

    The best educators should offer something that encompasses all the learning styles eg talking about it to the class, then showing a video or pictures and then getting them up in groups to practise it themselves.

    Most lectures or inservices that I attend will do all of those. I’m a visual learner, I don’t get as much out of just reading or listening [more likely to fall asleep], I need to see it in action or follow diagrams and pictures. Then I remember it best by practising and ‘doing’ it myself.

    Wonder if it has something to do with info first being committed to short term memory and then long term memory where retained – anyone know?

    There are also cultural considerations as to methods of learning eg traditionally, aboriginal children are not told they are doing something wrong, not corrected as such, that would be to humiliate or ‘shame’ them, they are gently shown the correct way and they copy.

  20. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 2:05 pm

    You are right Armchair. There are so many different ways of learning. A great teacher makes learning an adventure, opens doors, shows you how to think and make connections. I remember one from schooldays. Some of the others were as dull as. I am sure I could understand maths if only someone had alerted me to the patterns. I heard a discussion recently on our Australian Communist Broadcaster that European languages and history are going tp play second fiddle to their Asian counterparts. Of course we need to know more about our region and their languages but we also need to know about our European heritage. It shouldn’t be either/or but both/and.

  21. TB Queensland permalink
    July 30, 2013 2:21 pm

    KL…

    All my graduate trainer assessors were given a simple but easily remembered tool …

    Do it normal
    Do it slow
    Watch me do it
    Now you have a go

    Works in many ways at many levels …

    You are correct re learning styles and they do need to be combined … I prefer the term learning facilitator to trainer or teacher … one focuses on the delivery the other on how people actually learn …

    As for short term/long term memory … you are correct …

    Competency skills/knowledge develops in stages …

    Unconscious incompetence … you are unaware of what is needed to be competence
    Conscious incompetence … you become aware of your need to learn
    Conscious competence … you are competent but need to think about what you do
    Unconscious competence … you can complete the task without even thinking about it …

    I use the analogy of how you drive a car now (experienced adults) and how you felt when you first stated to learn to drive …

  22. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 2:33 pm

    That is great advice TB. I will Memorise it. It is actually soothing to read and say.

  23. armchair opinionator permalink
    July 30, 2013 2:57 pm

    Australian Communist Broadcaster

    😆

  24. TB Queensland permalink
    July 30, 2013 3:38 pm

    Don’t let, sb, find out you listen to ACB … is it associated with the ABC at all? 😉

  25. Dianne permalink
    July 30, 2013 7:26 pm

    Shhhhhhhh

  26. July 30, 2013 9:02 pm

    armchair *anti immunisation nutjobs*
    there is a silver lining to this,
    sooner or later h1n1/sars/golden-staff/superbugs will sort these dills out and increase mankinds IQ tenfold, (penicillin is starting to fail)

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