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The Weekend Arts Show with ToSY!

October 10, 2014

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ToSY asked nicely for an occasional thread where we could post pictures and other artistic stuff so here it is.

Gilbert and George are an artistic couple who live in London.  Despite their conservative appearance they have gained notoriety for large scale artworks, called “The Pictures” which often feature street kids and other aspects of youth culture.  Their artworks often feature images of themselves and often ridicule the establishment.

One painting called “Money and Shit” featured dollar signs and depictions of human faeces made from real human excrement.   The international buyer who paid a multi-million dollar figure for the painting demanded his money back when he later discovered what the painting was made from.

Gilbert and George gladly refunded the money remarking that “the buyer was happy.”

“He got his money back….”

“… And we got our Money and Shit back.”

 

 

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Over to you ToSY….(I’ll be expecting you to write the next Arts post … 🙂 )

 

 

 

 

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148 Comments leave one →
  1. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    October 10, 2014 12:17 pm

    Fifi is an ‘artiste’ – but I can’t post details or images of her work.

  2. Walrus permalink
    October 10, 2014 12:45 pm

    TomR is a Bullshit Artist………………….. does he get to contribute ?

  3. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 1:38 pm

    “Over to you ToSY….(I’ll be expecting you to write the next Arts post … 🙂 )”

    Um, oookay. 😯

    In the meantime, I’ll be obessing over this guy’s videos. He paints only with palette knifes, never brushes, and his colours are brilliant.

  4. October 10, 2014 2:08 pm

    I do like Girl With a Pearl Earing…

  5. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 2:10 pm

    I like The Milkmaid, and tried to post it, but failed. That’s what all that google stuff is about. ;-(

  6. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 2:29 pm

    (He also used purple-and-yellow, which, like the other complementary colour schemes, is found repeatedly in nature.)

  7. TB Queensland permalink
    October 10, 2014 2:50 pm

    Perhaps we should have a model railway thread, sreb … 🙄

    Whooo speaking of which … gotta go …

  8. October 10, 2014 3:16 pm

    Yeah – where are my fkn weathering tips???????????

  9. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 3:54 pm

    “weathering” 😆

    Monet’s water lilies paintings were as much about the water and the reflections it captured, as they were about the lilies. He liked trains too!

  10. TB Queensland permalink
    October 10, 2014 4:44 pm

    Yeah – where are my fkn weathering tips???????????

    copies in the box … chief …

  11. October 10, 2014 5:48 pm

    My contribution…lots of reds & blacks utilised for the positive, reverent vibe the artist was trying to achieve.

  12. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 7:16 pm

    Way, way back, even Titian was using complementary colour schemes; blue-and-orange, and red-and-green in this one, c.1520-1523:

  13. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 7:46 pm

    “All my work is based to some extent on Japanese art” ~ Van Gogh

  14. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 8:07 pm

    See if The Milkmaid works this time …

  15. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 8:29 pm

    Dali liked rhinos …

  16. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 8:58 pm

    Whereas Jeffrey Smart liked 44 gallon drums …

  17. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 9:21 pm

    In 1907, Frederick McCubbin made his one and only trip to Europe, where he saw and was inspired by Turners and Impressionism. It shows in this one …

  18. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 9:39 pm

    As for the contemporary art scene in Melbourne, David Chen won best-in-show at both the Camberwell and Box Hill art shows.

  19. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 10, 2014 10:13 pm

    At the moment I’m leaning toward Hopper’s style.

  20. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 10, 2014 10:17 pm

    David Chen’s works has an exciting vibrancy.

  21. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    October 10, 2014 10:19 pm

    It’s possible that I’ll learn something on this thread. That’s unusual because I currently don’t have much to learn.

  22. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 10:28 pm

    “I currently don’t have much to learn”

    I know the feeling.

  23. Tony permalink
    October 10, 2014 10:29 pm

    I love Nighthawks too, el g.

  24. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 10, 2014 10:56 pm

    He was originally an illustrator and some of his early work appears awkward and a little too contrived.

    By comparison this contemporary artist has struck a rich vein and is laughing all the way to the bank.

  25. armchair opinionator permalink
    October 11, 2014 12:40 am

    I kinda like Ben quilty at the moment. I like the bold use of colour and arrangement (not sure if that’s art speak at all, it’s my layperson opinion)

    http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2014-10-07/hillsong-brian-houston/5796152

  26. armchair opinionator permalink
    October 11, 2014 12:43 am

    Oops I have no idea how that link got in there, I blame my mobile!

  27. October 11, 2014 1:02 am

    ”””It’s possible that I’ll learn something on this thread.”””

    #guffaw Why change gears this late in the race.?

  28. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 6:13 am

    Van Gogh, Bedroom In Arles

    Lichtenstein, Bedroom At Arles

  29. October 11, 2014 7:46 am

    Jeffrey Smart is one of my all time favourite painters…

    You can see this magnificent beauty at the Arts Centre In Melbourne..

    Not many people know that.

  30. October 11, 2014 7:52 am

    And who can forget this….

    Clive James had been hounding Jeffrey Smart for years to paint him a portrait. Jeffrey Smart declined on several occasions and eventually relented after many pleas from Clive James.

    No doubt, a not unsubstantial sum of money changed hands, however apparently Clive James was absolutely livid when he was presented with this in return…

  31. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 11, 2014 9:18 am

    ** chuckle **

  32. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 12:26 pm

    Tom Roberts, Bourke Street, c. 1886

  33. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 11, 2014 12:33 pm

    I see your Roberts and raise you Arthur Streeton.

    http://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/6416/

  34. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 11, 2014 1:28 pm

    To which I’ll add my associate David Lake.

    http://www.blayneychronicle.com.au/story/1087948/newbridge-artist-up-for-arts-prize/

  35. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 5:58 pm

    Again with Turner and his skies.

  36. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 6:27 pm

    Blue-and-orange always works. Monet knew this.

  37. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 6:37 pm

    (As did Jeffrey Smart, judging by his Clive James picture; and his freight train, where he also uses the red-green complementary.)

  38. October 11, 2014 6:38 pm

    Red is always best.

    Nothing else works when explicit gore is what you crave…

  39. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 6:40 pm

    😉

  40. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 7:39 pm

    Picasso had some idea about colour, too.

  41. October 11, 2014 7:43 pm

    So did Tom Araya.

  42. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 7:45 pm

    So I see …

  43. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 8:17 pm

    armchair opinionator,

    Quilty is no colourist, but his technique is interesting.

  44. Tony permalink
    October 11, 2014 8:28 pm

    What I’m looking at right now. Guess what colours …

    https://d3j5vwomefv46c.cloudfront.net/photos/large/867734826.jpg?1413019149

  45. October 11, 2014 9:34 pm

    Analogous?

  46. October 11, 2014 10:24 pm

    Is LSD the colour?

  47. Tony permalink
    October 12, 2014 2:19 am

    “Analogous?”

    I was gonna say ,,, wait for it … orange-and-blue.

    Anyhow, on another related note, if you look again at Smart’s ‘Man With 44 Gallon Drums’ (or whatever he actually called it),

    you’ll notice he uses a triadic colour scheme for the drums, in this case the three primary colours, red, yellow, and blue, (which, incidentally, are the only colours you need to mix every other colour, except white, which he also uses).

  48. October 12, 2014 7:48 am

    “you’ll notice he uses a triadic colour scheme for the drum”

    I was just about to say that.

  49. TB Queensland permalink
    October 12, 2014 10:21 am

    We visited the elephant park in Thailand and watched the elephants painting …

    We have an “original” in the bottom photo (tree) hanging in the spare (kids) room spent a few bob on a nice frame … and looks really noice …

    http://blog.greencupboards.com/2011/07/19/artistic-endangered-elephants/

    We’ve also got one of Woodinda’s paintings on the wall (picked up on a trip to Cairns) … we like his black and white works … and ours is two goannas head to tail … a couple of hundred bucks and a noice frame and it really stands out …

    http://www.doongal.com.au/category71_1.htm

    We’ve also got a photo I took of the moon … being held in the fingers of a rather spooky looking bloke … maybe the editor in chief can post it? 🙂

  50. October 12, 2014 1:41 pm

    “maybe the editor in chief can post it?”

    Of course, send it to me and I’ll pop it up.

  51. October 12, 2014 1:51 pm

    I hate hats like the one the strange man in the picture of drums is wearing.

  52. Tony permalink
    October 12, 2014 4:16 pm

    Van Gogh says his work was influenced by Japanese art, particularly woodblock prints, which were popular with the Paris art community of the time.

    It’s not hard to find the inspiration for Irises.

  53. Tony permalink
    October 12, 2014 4:59 pm

    More irises in this one.

  54. TB Queensland permalink
    October 12, 2014 5:34 pm

    sreb, photo on its way … TB

  55. TB Queensland permalink
    October 12, 2014 5:35 pm

    I rather like that last one, ToSY … is that a Van G?

  56. Tony permalink
    October 12, 2014 5:48 pm

    It’s a Chikanobu, TB. You can see more like it here.

  57. armchair opinionator permalink
    October 12, 2014 5:53 pm

    “…Quilty is no colourist, but histechnique is interesting…”

    Can’t they use whatever colours they like?
    Non conformity to the ‘colour rules’ should excite an artist!

  58. Tony permalink
    October 12, 2014 6:04 pm

    “Can’t they use whatever colours they like?”

    Yes, I was only stating the obvious. No offence intended. 🙂

  59. armchair opinionator permalink
    October 12, 2014 10:51 pm

    “Yes, I was only stating the obvious. No offence intended. ..”

    Oh none taken tony, my reply was meant to be
    light humour (should’ve added a 🙂

  60. October 13, 2014 10:25 am

    Vincent Locke, now there’s an artist!

  61. TB Queensland permalink
    October 13, 2014 9:27 pm

    ToSY thanks for the link

    I rather like Japanese and Chinese art (in the right place) … we have a delicate, large, original, Chinese water colour (gift from a former client) – in our kitchen would you believe – and it works …

  62. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 7:07 pm

    Dot paintings weren’t invented by the Impressionists, but some of them dabbled with what’s known as Pointillism.

    Seurat’s La Grande Jatte:

  63. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 7:16 pm

    Meanwhile, viewing the Grande Jatte poseurs from the Siene’s left bank, were the factory workers, having a swim on Sunday, their day off.

  64. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 7:54 pm

    Back to Turner: The Burning of the Houses of Lords.

  65. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 8:33 pm

    Whistler

    vs Monet

  66. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 8:34 pm

  67. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 17, 2014 8:38 pm

    I like Surat and copied his style for awhile, but in the end my art teacher told me to stop doing it because it was getting too close to dot painting, which would be politically incorrect.

  68. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 8:50 pm

    Ya like Dali?

  69. October 17, 2014 8:57 pm

    Yep I like Dali, and Rene Magritte….

  70. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 9:01 pm

    Nice.

    TB’d like that Magritte, too, ’cause of the train and the time-clock.

    Toot Toot.

  71. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 9:07 pm

    Monet did love trains, too …

  72. Tony permalink
    October 17, 2014 9:09 pm

    More Seurat dots for el G,

  73. October 17, 2014 9:31 pm

  74. October 17, 2014 9:41 pm

  75. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 3:28 pm

    Photorealism: Stardust Motel, John Baeder.

  76. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 20, 2014 4:48 pm

    I’m into photo realism, but once the structure is in place I employ a slight painterly effect to add romance.

  77. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 6:36 pm

    This McCubbin, Setting Sun c. 1911, shows the influence of Turner, whose paintings he viewed on his trip to London and Paris in 1907.

  78. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 20, 2014 7:20 pm

    Interesting to see how his style changed over the years and in the end his last impressions were away from photo realism. Correct me if I’m wrong.

  79. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 7:30 pm

    No, I think you’re right.

    He went from Lost c. 1886 (for example)

    to Collins Street c. 1915

  80. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 20, 2014 8:01 pm

    Technically he was brilliant and open to new influences, which can only be a good thing.

  81. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 8:24 pm

    It’s pretty obvious Frederick saw The wood sawyers c.1852 at the Tate

    which has to be the inspiration for <Bush sawyers c.1910

    He probably sketched it in his notebook, and composed his painting almost identically, including the colours of the clothing, and the attitude of the men.

  82. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 20, 2014 8:27 pm

    And he put in Australian sunlight.

  83. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 8:41 pm

    Right again.

    Another early one, The pioneer c.1904

    vs. a later one, Princes bridge c.1910.

  84. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 20, 2014 9:08 pm

    Romantic Impressionism

    http://flowerpress.blogspot.com.au/2008/09/clarice-beckett.html

  85. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 10:27 pm

    Melbourne was the engine room of Australian art in the early 20th century, but Sydney had something to say later on.

    Whitely liked Van Gogh, obviously ….

  86. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 10:35 pm

    He also knew about orange and blue …

  87. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 10:40 pm

    *Whiteley

  88. Tony permalink
    October 20, 2014 10:50 pm

    Vincent’s original

  89. egg permalink
    October 21, 2014 6:59 am

    Fascinating stuff, Tony.

  90. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 4:52 pm

    Rembrandt, Slaughtered Ox c.1655

  91. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 5:10 pm

    Jean-Leone Gerome, who was appointed one of three professors at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, didn’t like the “decadent fashion” of Impressionism (although he later softened his attitude after seeing the 1884 Manet exhibition at the Ecole).

    The Pelt Merchant of Cairo c.1869

  92. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 5:17 pm

    Jerome was paying tribute to another Rembrandt, Saul and David c.1630

  93. TB Queensland permalink
    October 21, 2014 5:24 pm

    That last is brilliant, ToSY … I’ve seen many of those above (from Stardust – I hadn’t seen before) …

    As with photography its all about the light! My father painted (his real talent was in pencil and charcoal – the shading was brilliant) but I used to take photos for him on my trips out west (he was fascinated with tumble down sheds and houses) …

    One of the few things I remember with good thoughts was having a drink with him and discussing composition and character positioning and shade and lighting …

    … when I got my first camera I thought that photography was a poor cousin to painting but it was my father who became fascinated with photography and changed my mind … he once said, “You can’t paint like me because you don’t spend the time to learn and experiment … but I can’t take photographs like you for the same reason” …

  94. TB Queensland permalink
    October 21, 2014 5:33 pm

    “That last” refers to The Pelt Merchant of Cairo

  95. Tom R permalink
    October 21, 2014 5:37 pm

    didn’t like the “decadent fashion” of Impressionism (although he later softened his attitude after seeing the 1884 Manet exhibition at the Ecole).

    I fear I am/was much of the same mind. I also have tempered more recently. I used to think “real” painting was photorealistic. Now, perhaps, I’m maturing?

    I still do prefer realism no matter the topic within the paintings. I also love what the new genre of cg artists are coming up with.

    eg

  96. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 21, 2014 5:52 pm

    Street Art

  97. October 21, 2014 5:53 pm

    ToSY have you been to MONA? The slaughtered Ox painting reminds me of the “installation piece” they had there – a large rack of (real) dead cow meat. It had to be replaced every few days (as you can imagine)…

  98. October 21, 2014 5:53 pm

    Is that a Banksy egg?

  99. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 6:05 pm

    No, reb, I haven’t been to MONA. I haven’t even been to Tassie. Whenever I do get away (not often enough, unfortunately), I seem to end up somewhere other than Tasmania.

  100. October 21, 2014 6:25 pm

    “I seem to end up somewhere other than Tasmania.”

    Ordinarily I’d say that’s quite sensible, however as an appreciator of art, a visit to MONA is essential – it’s well worth the excursion!

  101. Tom R permalink
    October 21, 2014 6:29 pm

    I must say though, that some “art” is beyond my ken

  102. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 6:42 pm

    “a visit to MONA is essential – it’s well worth the excursion!”

    Okay then, I trust your recommendation.

  103. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 6:50 pm

    TB, I don’t know much about photography (all my Europe pics were taken on an iPhone), although I think I have a smalle clue about composition. Can you put up some photos you’ve taken (besides The Moon)?

  104. TB Queensland permalink
    October 21, 2014 7:31 pm

    We’ve been to MONA – worth the visit, some odd displays tho’ – Tassie is a great place to visit, lovely people …

    There’s a fabulous wire sculpture of a truck outside MONA …

  105. TB Queensland permalink
    October 21, 2014 7:33 pm

    ToSY, I would if I knew how too safely … I sent the moon shot to the editor in chief … I’m not keen to put anything up from my computer or Picasa or Flickr … ASIO might track them back …

  106. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 7:38 pm

    We haven’t yet touched on the Heidelberg School, although Frederick McCubbin was an integral part.

    Others were: Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder, Walter Withers, Albert Fullwood, Rupert Bunny, Thomas Clark, Florence Fuller, Emanuel Phillips Fox, David Davies, Tudor St George Tucker, Aby Alston, Girolamo Nerli, Eugene Von Guerard, Tom Humphrey, J.H. Carse, John Longstaff, Jane Sutherland, Julian Ashton, John Ford Paterson, Louis Buvelot, Louis Abrahams, Arthur Loureiro, John Mather, George Walton, John Peter Russell, Alfred Daplyn, Clara Southern, and George Folingsby,

    It was unmistakably an Impressionist art movement, even though the French will tell you that’s impossible: Impressionism didn’t exist outside their country!

  107. TB Queensland permalink
    October 21, 2014 7:42 pm

    ToSY, you’re starting to sound a bit like Wally, mate … zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Gotta love “experts” who love their subject …

  108. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    October 21, 2014 7:57 pm

    I think it is all quite interesting

  109. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 8:07 pm

    Walter Withers, Yachts Off Williamstown c.1905

  110. October 21, 2014 8:07 pm

    “I think it is all quite interesting”

    I think that’s the first time I’ve ever heard those words uttered on this blog….

    Are you sure you’re in the right place.. 😯

  111. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 8:08 pm

    All right, TB, I’ll give it a spell.

  112. October 21, 2014 8:45 pm

    No don’t ToSY. I’m enjoying the thread as I’m sure others are too..

    What would TB know about art anyway? He’s from Australia’s mono cultural vacuum.

  113. October 21, 2014 8:46 pm

    “Gotta love “experts” who love their subject …”

    What you mean like HR or military history………………..??

    *eyes glazing over*

  114. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 9:08 pm

    ” He’s from Australia’s mono cultural vacuum.”

    Heh. Fair enough.

  115. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 9:11 pm

    A photo for TB, Dali and Man Ray.

  116. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 9:20 pm

    The Picasso Sold for $95 million

    whereas the Lichtenstein for a mere $56 mill. A steal!

  117. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 9:36 pm

    Apparently Roy’s works were fairly iimposing

  118. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 9:46 pm

    Caravaggio, St Jerome c.1606

  119. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 10:01 pm

    Caravaggio again, a fruity boy this time 😯

  120. Tony permalink
    October 21, 2014 10:28 pm

    Titian. The Rape of Europa c.1562

  121. armchair opinionator permalink
    October 21, 2014 11:39 pm

    Artemisia Gentileschi “My illustrious lordship, I’ll show you what a woman can do”

  122. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 3:04 pm

    The Sun King at the Louvre.

    Hyacinthe Rigaud, Louis XIV c.1701

  123. October 22, 2014 4:46 pm

    That king looks like a queen.

    #justsayin’

  124. October 22, 2014 4:50 pm

    Nice stockings he/she is wearing. Heels too.

  125. October 22, 2014 4:50 pm

    Haha, I think we may have had a simultaneous epiphany there, reb!

  126. October 22, 2014 4:52 pm

    AO’s painting @11:39…

    Best of thread!

  127. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 7:51 pm

    You’ll need to click on this one to see the detail. Hieronymus Bosch was a surrealist before surrealism was even a thing. Four Hundred years before Dali!

    The Garden of Earthly Delights c.1505

  128. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 7:52 pm

    Try the smaller version here

  129. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 7:54 pm

    (Click the first link for ultra hi-def.)

  130. TB Queensland permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:01 pm

    ToSY and sreb … I meant this …

    Others were: Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder, Walter Withers, Albert Fullwood, Rupert Bunny, Thomas Clark, Florence Fuller, Emanuel Phillips Fox, David Davies, Tudor St George Tucker, Aby Alston, Girolamo Nerli, Eugene Von Guerard, Tom Humphrey, J.H. Carse, John Longstaff, Jane Sutherland, Julian Ashton, John Ford Paterson, Louis Buvelot, Louis Abrahams, Arthur Loureiro, John Mather, George Walton, John Peter Russell, Alfred Daplyn, Clara Southern, and George Folingsby,

    Enjoy the paintings … but a list of names …. zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    That king looks like a queen.

    Don’t all WCP?

    Just sayin’ …

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    AO’s painting @11:39…

    Best of thread!

    I’m getting a bit concerned about you two …

  131. TB Queensland permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:04 pm

    (Click the first link for ultra hi-def.)

    Whoa … you can say that again … but worth the wait!

    That is clever, ToSY!

  132. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:10 pm

    “Enjoy the paintings … but a list of names …. zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz”

    Fair enough, TB. (I guess I thought that although many of those names are well known, not a lot of people would know they were all Heidelberg School artists.)

    That is all.

  133. October 22, 2014 8:17 pm

    Am I mistaken, or is that The jeebus pawing Eve in Adam’s presence, surrounded by fornicators & freaks?!

  134. October 22, 2014 8:18 pm

    Even better, I can now see the fiery plains of Hades!

  135. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:22 pm

    Could be. Here’s how the Museo Del Prado describes it …

    ‘The open triptych shows three scenes. The left panel is dedicated to Paradise, with the creation of Eve and the fountain of life, while the right panel shows hell. The central panel gives its name to the entire piece, representing a garden of life’s delights or pleasures. Between paradise and hell, these delights are nothing more than allusions to sin, showing humankind dedicated to diverse worldly pleasures. There are clear and strongly erotic representations of lust, along with others, whose meanings are more enigmatic. The fleeting beauty of flowers and the sweetness of fruit transmit a message of fragility and the ephemeral character of happiness and enjoyment. This seems to be corroborated by certain groups, such as the couple enclosed in a crystal ball on the left, which probably alludes to the popular Flemish saying: “happiness is like glass, it soon breaks”.’

  136. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:24 pm

    Yeah, top-right is your area. 😉

  137. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:31 pm

    ‘Is that a Banksy egg?’

    Yep

  138. Tony permalink
    October 22, 2014 8:42 pm

    Some reckon Dali’s The Great Masturbator

    is a tribute to this, from the lower-right of the left panel of the above Bosch

  139. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 22, 2014 11:07 pm

    Was John Peter Russell a close associate of Van Gough?

    Always liked Rupert Bunny for romance.

    Caravaggio’s sharp light (from no particular source) and dark backgrounds must have been revolutionary at the time and still useful today.

  140. eggboxtroll permalink
    October 23, 2014 7:11 am

    Genuine brain fade there, should be van Gogh.

  141. Tony permalink
    October 23, 2014 5:24 pm

    Being a fan of Magritte, reb will be familiar with this one.

    The Son of Man 1964

  142. Tony permalink
    October 23, 2014 5:49 pm

    Another J-L Gerome, Young Greeks Attending a Cock Fight

  143. Tony permalink
    October 23, 2014 6:08 pm

    “Was John Peter Russell a close associate of Van Gough?”

    I believe he was, among others, during his time in France.

  144. Tony permalink
    October 23, 2014 6:47 pm

    Albrecht Durer, Self Portrait 1498

  145. Tony permalink
    October 23, 2014 7:04 pm

    For anyone not sure what Rubenesque looks like.

    Peter Paul Rubens, The Three Graces c.1635

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