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Art for Arts Sake (Part two)

December 5, 2014
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250 Comments
  1. December 5, 2014 9:40 pm

    Thanks to the blogmeister for providing a refreshing thread.

    How about some seascapes?

    Summer Squall, 1904. A seascape by Winslow Homer.

  2. December 5, 2014 9:46 pm

    We’ve had this before, but you can’t have a seascape theme without it.

    Turner, The Fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, 1839

  3. December 5, 2014 9:52 pm

    Turner, Snow Storm. Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth, 1842

  4. December 5, 2014 9:56 pm

    Rembrandt, The Storm on the Sea of Galilee, 1633

  5. December 5, 2014 10:01 pm

    J. M. W. Turner, The Slave Ship, 1840

  6. December 5, 2014 10:03 pm

    Eugène Delacroix, Christ on the Sea of Galilee, 1854

  7. December 5, 2014 10:06 pm

    This is spectacular.

    Ivan Aivazovsky, The Ninth Wave, 1850

  8. December 5, 2014 10:18 pm

    Caspar David Friedrich, The Stages of Life, 1835

  9. December 6, 2014 12:31 am

    I like the skulls, of course.

    But the sea is awesome. It may as well be another planet.

  10. December 6, 2014 9:14 am

    But with all those waves, how could he sit still enough to paint them?

  11. Tom R permalink
    December 6, 2014 9:19 am

    They took a photo first of course reb 😉

  12. Tom R permalink
    December 6, 2014 9:21 am

    Although the Fact that Rembrandt got heyzeus into his still photo before painting over it Proves his existanz

  13. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    December 6, 2014 9:36 am

    These are enjoyable threads . Good work by reb and Tony.

    I looking for a seaside theme – Pipeline or Waimea Bay, I’ll look for a suitably Endless Summer style one later.

  14. Tom R permalink
    December 6, 2014 9:41 am

    I thought you’d be out pipin it already yomm?

  15. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    December 6, 2014 9:46 am

    The surf is quite big at Pipeline. Dangerous too, it’s for young people, mature types are a little slow to their feet and finish up being pounded.

  16. Tom R permalink
    December 6, 2014 9:55 am

    Stick with Sellicks yomm 🙂

    It’s built for age 🙂

  17. December 6, 2014 10:12 am

    “”They took a photo first of course reb “”

    That makes a lot of sense.

    Say, does anyone know when Instagram are meant to be releasing their instamatic camera… I see that Polaroid have come out with one, but i haven’t heard when the Instagram one is due out..

  18. December 6, 2014 5:38 pm

    Winslow Homer, Breezing Up (A Fair Wind), 1873–76

  19. December 6, 2014 5:40 pm

    Winslow Homer, Sunlight on the Coast, 1890

  20. December 6, 2014 5:42 pm

    Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899

  21. December 6, 2014 5:44 pm

    Homer, The Fog Warning, 1885

  22. December 6, 2014 5:48 pm

    Everyone knows who this artist is, by now.

    Seascape at Saintes-Maries (Fishing Boats at Sea), 1888

  23. December 6, 2014 5:49 pm

    Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries, June 1888

  24. December 6, 2014 5:50 pm

    The Sea at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, 1888

  25. December 6, 2014 5:52 pm

    Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries, watercolor, 1888

  26. December 6, 2014 5:56 pm

    The original Impressionist painting.

    Claude Monet, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), 1872

  27. December 6, 2014 6:00 pm

    Édouard Manet, Boating, (1874)

  28. December 6, 2014 6:02 pm

    Claude Monet, The Cliff at Étretat after the Storm, 1885

  29. December 6, 2014 6:05 pm

    Armand Guillaumin, Sunset at Ivry (Soleil couchant à Ivry), 1873

  30. December 6, 2014 6:07 pm

    Claude Monet, Jardin à Sainte-Adresse, 1867

  31. December 6, 2014 6:10 pm

    Homer, The Herring Net, 1885

  32. December 6, 2014 6:18 pm

    Homer, The Life Line, 1884

  33. December 6, 2014 6:59 pm

    Pablo Picasso, 1919, Sleeping Peasants, gouache, watercolor and pencil on paper

  34. December 6, 2014 7:03 pm

    1916, L’anis del mono (Bottle of Anis del Mono)

  35. December 6, 2014 7:05 pm

    Pablo Picasso, 1905, Garçon à la pipe, (Boy with a Pipe), Rose Period

  36. December 6, 2014 7:11 pm

    “Turner often used a colour scheme in which blue and yellow
    were paired. His preference for complementary colour schemes
    of orange-yellows contrasting with blue-purples was regarded by
    his peers at the Royal Academy as breaking ‘the rules’. Some of
    them rudely called him ‘the Yellow Dwarf’ for his predominant use
    of yellow.

    “Turner was a keen student of the colour theories being
    discussed at the time between scientists and artists, including
    those of the German poet, Goethe. Many of these theories
    explored how colour affects us emotionally.”

    http://www.artgallery.sa.gov.au/agsa/home/Learning/docs/Turner-Education_Resource-Reloaded-Online.pdf

  37. December 6, 2014 7:13 pm

    ‘The 3 tricks of complementary colours you can learn from Van Gogh’

    http://willkempartschool.com/complementary-colours/

  38. December 6, 2014 7:32 pm

    Joachim Beuckelaer, Christ in the House of Martha and Mary, 1565

  39. December 6, 2014 7:56 pm

    Camille Pissarro, Boulevard Montmartre, 1897

  40. December 6, 2014 7:59 pm

    Mary Cassatt, Lydia Leaning on Her Arms (in a theatre box), 1879

  41. December 6, 2014 8:00 pm

    Édouard Manet, A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (Un Bar aux Folies-Bergère), 1882

  42. December 6, 2014 8:02 pm

    Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street, Rainy Day, 1877

  43. December 6, 2014 8:03 pm

    Edgar Degas, Dancers at The Bar, 1888

  44. December 6, 2014 8:05 pm

    Claude Monet, Haystacks, (sunset), 1890–1891

  45. December 6, 2014 8:07 pm

    Edgar Degas, Woman in the Bath, 1886

  46. December 6, 2014 8:16 pm

    Brett Whiteley, Lavender Bay at Dusk, 1984

  47. December 6, 2014 8:18 pm

    Brett Whiteley, The Olgas for Ernest Giles (Also Known as to Ernest Giles), 1985

  48. December 6, 2014 8:22 pm

    Whiteley, My Armchair, 1976

  49. December 6, 2014 8:25 pm

    Whiteley, Arkie Under the Shower, 1986-87

  50. December 6, 2014 8:29 pm

  51. December 6, 2014 8:34 pm

    Édouard Manet, The Plum,1878

  52. December 6, 2014 8:38 pm

    Pablo Picasso, 1901-02, Femme au café (Absinthe Drinker)

  53. December 6, 2014 8:42 pm

    Manet, The Absinthe Drinker, 1859

  54. December 6, 2014 8:43 pm

    Picasso. English: The Absinthe Drinker, French: Portrait bleu de Angel Fernández de Soto

  55. December 6, 2014 8:46 pm

    We’ve has this before, but it’s worth another go just for that expression.

    Degas, L’Absinthe, 1876

  56. December 6, 2014 8:51 pm

    Viktor Oliva, The Absinthe Drinker, 1901. The original painting can be found in the Café Slavia in Prague.

  57. December 6, 2014 8:52 pm

    Albert Maignan’s “Green Muse” (1895): a poet succumbs to the Green Fairy.

  58. December 6, 2014 8:56 pm

    La fin de la Fée Verte (The End of the Green Fairy): Swiss poster criticising the country’s prohibition of absinthe in 1910

  59. December 6, 2014 8:57 pm

    Preparing absinthe using the traditional method, which does not involve burning.

  60. December 6, 2014 8:59 pm

    Absinthe spoons are designed to perch a sugar cube atop the glass, over which ice-cold water is dripped to dilute the absinthe. The lip near the centre of the handle lets the spoon rest securely on the rim of the glass.

  61. December 6, 2014 9:00 pm

    Slowly dripping ice water from an absinthe fountain

  62. December 6, 2014 9:03 pm

    ‘Absinthe’s popularity grew steadily through the 1840s, when absinthe was given to French troops as a malaria preventive. When the troops returned home, they brought their taste for absinthe home with them. The custom of drinking absinthe gradually became so popular in bars, bistros, cafés, and cabarets that, by the 1860s, the hour of 5 p.m. was called l’heure verte (“the green hour”). Absinthe was favoured by all social classes, from the wealthy bourgeoisie, to poor artists and ordinary working-class people. By the 1880s, mass production had caused the price of absinthe to drop sharply. By 1910, the French were drinking 36 million litres of absinthe per year, as compared to their annual consumption of almost 5 billion litres of wine.’ – Wiki

  63. December 6, 2014 9:22 pm

    Rembrandt, Portrait of Jan Six, 1654

  64. December 6, 2014 9:23 pm

    Paul Gauguin, The Painter of Sunflowers, Portrait of Vincent van Gogh, 1888

  65. December 6, 2014 9:25 pm

    Rembrandt group portrait, The Syndics of the Clothmaker’s Guild/i>, 1662

  66. December 6, 2014 9:27 pm

    Henri Matisse, The Green Stripe, Portrait of Madame Matisse, 1905

  67. December 6, 2014 9:29 pm

    Thomas Gainsborough, The Blue Boy, c.1770

  68. December 6, 2014 9:31 pm

    Portrait of Gertrude Stein, 1906, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. When someone commented that Stein did not look like her portrait, Picasso replied, “She will”.

  69. December 6, 2014 9:33 pm

    Francisco de Goya, Charles IV of Spain and His Family, 1800–1801

  70. December 6, 2014 9:34 pm

    Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, portrait of Napoleon on his Imperial Throne, 1806, Musée de l’Armée, Paris

  71. December 6, 2014 9:40 pm

    Jacques-Louis David, Napoleon in His Study, 1812

  72. December 6, 2014 9:42 pm

    James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Arrangement in Grey and Black: The Artist’s Mother, 1871, popularly known as Whistler’s Mother.

  73. December 6, 2014 9:46 pm

    John Singer Sargent, Portrait of Robert Louis Stevenson, 1887

  74. December 6, 2014 9:47 pm

    Vincent van Gogh, Portrait of Doctor Gachet, (first version), 1890

  75. December 6, 2014 9:49 pm

    Gustav Klimt, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, 1907

  76. December 6, 2014 9:51 pm

    Boris Grigoriev, Portrait of Vsevolod Meyerhold, 1916

  77. December 6, 2014 9:57 pm

    Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait of Léopold Zborowski, 1918

  78. December 6, 2014 9:58 pm

    Modigliani, Pablo Picasso and André Salmon, 1916

  79. December 6, 2014 10:00 pm

    Modigliani, The little peasant, 1918, Tate Modern, London

  80. December 6, 2014 10:05 pm

    Modigliani, Reclining Nude, 1917, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

  81. December 6, 2014 10:38 pm

    John Singer Sargent, Gondoliers’ Siesta, c.1904, watercolor

  82. December 6, 2014 10:40 pm

    Sargent, Rosina, 1878, depicting Rosina Ferrara

  83. December 6, 2014 10:44 pm

    “John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925) was an American artist, considered the “leading portrait painter of his generation” for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury. During his career, he created roughly 900 oil paintings and more than 2,000 watercolors, as well as countless sketches and charcoal drawings. His oeuvre documents worldwide travel, from Venice to the Tyrol, Corfu, the Middle East, Montana, Maine, and Florida.

    “His parents were American, but he was trained in Paris prior to moving to London. Sargent enjoyed international acclaim as a portrait painter, although not without controversy and some critical reservation; an early submission to the Paris Salon, his “Portrait of Madame X”, was intended to consolidate his position as a society painter, but it resulted in scandal instead.”

  84. December 6, 2014 10:47 pm

    Sargent, Street in Venice, c.1882, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

  85. December 6, 2014 10:49 pm

    Sargent, Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose, 1885–86, the Tate, London

  86. December 6, 2014 10:51 pm

    Sargent, The Fountain, Villa Torlonia, Frascati, Italy, 1907

  87. December 6, 2014 10:55 pm

    Sargent, Robert Louis Stevenson and His Wife, 1885, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

  88. December 6, 2014 10:57 pm

    Sargent, An Artist in His Studio, 1904

  89. December 6, 2014 11:01 pm

    Sargent, Morning Walk, 1888

  90. December 6, 2014 11:02 pm

    Monet, Woman with a Parasol, facing left, 1886

  91. December 6, 2014 11:03 pm

    Claude Monet, Woman with a Parasol – Madame Monet and Her Son, 1875, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

  92. December 6, 2014 11:12 pm

    Monet, Woman with a Parasol, facing right, 1886

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bb/Monet-woman-with-a-

  93. December 6, 2014 11:13 pm

  94. December 6, 2014 11:14 pm

    Duelling parasols.

  95. December 6, 2014 11:19 pm

    I think Sargent borrowed this from Monet, too, for his parasol picture. NTTAWWT.

  96. December 7, 2014 12:15 am

    So much art!

  97. December 9, 2014 9:30 pm

    John Singer Sargent, Spanish Dancer, 1881

    El Jaleo, 1882

  98. December 9, 2014 9:34 pm

    David Chen, Skylight (Light From Above)

  99. December 9, 2014 9:44 pm

    Van Gogh, The Dance hall In Arles, 1888

  100. December 9, 2014 9:48 pm

    Henri Matisse, Dance (i), 1909

    Dance, 1910

  101. December 9, 2014 9:52 pm

    Degas, Dancers, 1899, pastel on paper

  102. December 9, 2014 10:07 pm

    Let’s have this again, Because I’m fascinated by the picture, but also by the whole story of the Sun King.

  103. December 9, 2014 10:40 pm

    (What I meant to say is: the painting’s fascinating, so, also, is the story of the Sun King.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_XIV_of_France

  104. December 9, 2014 11:30 pm

    Reasonable painter …

  105. December 9, 2014 11:39 pm

  106. December 9, 2014 11:48 pm

  107. December 9, 2014 11:55 pm

    XV

  108. December 11, 2014 3:14 pm

    Sargent, An Out-Of-Doors Study, 1889

  109. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 4:50 pm

    Sargent did outstanding work.

  110. December 11, 2014 6:05 pm

    Paul Cezanne, Basket of Apples, 1895

  111. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 7:10 pm

    Escher

  112. December 11, 2014 7:30 pm

    Peter Paul Rubens, Portrait of a Young Scholar, 1597

  113. December 11, 2014 7:46 pm

    Hippopotamus Hunt, 1616. “Rubens is known for the frenetic energy and lusty ebullience of his paintings.”

  114. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 7:58 pm

    Super Real Orientalism

    A Street Scene, Cairo

    Leopold Carl Muller, 1880

  115. December 11, 2014 8:05 pm

    Rubens, Tiger Hunt, 1617-1618

  116. December 11, 2014 8:20 pm

    (Notice in the Hippopotamus Hunt, Rubens features the triadic colour sheme,:Red-Yellow-Blue.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RYB_color_model#Color_wheel

  117. December 11, 2014 8:24 pm

    I can see the same triad in Muller’s Street Scene, plus our old favourite orange-and-blue.

  118. December 11, 2014 8:36 pm

    Pierre-Auguste Renoir, En été / La bohémienne (In Summer / The Gypsy Girl), 1868

  119. December 11, 2014 8:54 pm

    Auguste Renoir – Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette, 1876

    There are two versions of this painting (as well as a largely monochrome study in Copenhagen). The larger and better known version is the one in the Musée d’Orsay. This is the smaller version, held in the Whitney Collection until 1990 when it was sold at Sotheby’s, New York, for the then record price of US$78 million. The painting is now believed to be in a Swiss private collection. Other than in size, the paintings are almost identical, one evidently being an exact copy of the other, although the Whitney version is executed more freely. It is not known which was first exhibited, nor even which first painted.

  120. December 11, 2014 9:07 pm

    Selfie by painter of The Scream.

    Edvard Munch, Self-Portrait. 1882

  121. December 11, 2014 9:09 pm

    Munch, Self Portrait with Skeleton Arm, 1895

  122. December 11, 2014 9:12 pm

    Munch, Self-Portrait in Hell. 1903

  123. December 11, 2014 9:14 pm

    Edvard Munch at the Beach in Warnemünde. 1907

  124. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 9:17 pm

    Robyn Collier, contemporary Australian seascape artist.

  125. December 11, 2014 9:17 pm

    Clearly, he had “issues”.

    Self-Portrait “à la Marat”. 1908–09

  126. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 9:20 pm

    ‘Clearly, he had “issues”.

    *chuckle*

  127. December 11, 2014 9:21 pm

    Munch, On the Sofa. 1913

  128. December 11, 2014 9:23 pm

    Munch, Portrait of Friedrich Nietzsche, 1906

  129. December 11, 2014 9:28 pm

    Munch.

    Death in the Sickroom. 1893

    Death in the Sickroom, 1895

  130. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 9:28 pm

    Percy Trezise

  131. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 9:37 pm

    Don’t know who did this Hillside Gum.

  132. December 11, 2014 9:38 pm

    Munch was clearly inspired by the Impressionists – even Seurat’s Pointillism – flourishing in Paris at the time.

    The Seine at Saint-Cloud. 1890

  133. December 11, 2014 9:42 pm

    No, I do not.

  134. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 9:46 pm

    I found it in one of those ‘Twenty Best Australian Landscapes’, lovely technique.

    Pointilism is fun to do, but never understood the finer technical points.

    Seurat, The Lighthouse

  135. December 11, 2014 9:47 pm

  136. December 11, 2014 9:56 pm

    Jealousy. 1907. Munch Museum, Oslo

  137. December 11, 2014 9:58 pm

    Death of Marat I, 1907

  138. December 11, 2014 10:01 pm

    The Sick Child, 1907

  139. December 11, 2014 10:03 pm

  140. December 11, 2014 10:04 pm

  141. December 11, 2014 10:05 pm

  142. December 11, 2014 10:07 pm

  143. December 11, 2014 10:09 pm

  144. December 11, 2014 10:10 pm

  145. December 11, 2014 10:11 pm

  146. December 11, 2014 10:14 pm

  147. egg permalink
    December 11, 2014 10:51 pm

  148. December 11, 2014 11:04 pm

    I think we need a new thread, only because it’s slow to load.

    And only if the authorities want one.

  149. December 11, 2014 11:16 pm

    Can I just add this …

  150. December 12, 2014 8:30 pm

    John Singer SARGENT, Lord Ribblesdale

  151. December 12, 2014 8:35 pm

    Sargent, Sir Frank Swettenham, 1904

  152. egg permalink
    December 12, 2014 8:41 pm

    Singer Sargent 1919

  153. December 12, 2014 8:42 pm

    I think we need some Christmas art.

  154. December 12, 2014 9:04 pm

  155. December 12, 2014 9:05 pm

  156. December 12, 2014 9:14 pm

  157. December 12, 2014 9:18 pm

  158. December 12, 2014 9:22 pm

  159. December 12, 2014 9:25 pm

  160. December 12, 2014 9:35 pm

    Edgar Degas, Self portrait in a Soft Hat, 1858

  161. December 12, 2014 9:37 pm

    Degas, Self Portrait Saluting, 1866

  162. egg permalink
    December 12, 2014 9:39 pm

    Gauguin

  163. December 12, 2014 9:40 pm

    Head of a Young Woman, 1857

  164. December 12, 2014 10:02 pm

    Balthus, The cardgame, 1950

  165. egg permalink
    December 12, 2014 10:37 pm

    Rupert Bunny, ‘Who Comes’ 1908

  166. December 13, 2014 11:04 am

    Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, At the Moulin Rouge, 1895

  167. egg permalink
    December 13, 2014 11:15 am

    Henri died from absinthe poisoning.

  168. egg permalink
    December 13, 2014 2:05 pm

    ‘The nickname given to absinthe, La Fee verte (The Green Lady), comes from the “love affair” many drinkers had with absinthe, granting the drink the status of a muse.’

  169. December 13, 2014 5:46 pm

    George Stubbs, Whistlejacket, c. 1762, National Gallery, London.

  170. December 13, 2014 5:50 pm

    India’s banksy?

    http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-30447979

  171. egg permalink
    December 13, 2014 6:08 pm

    Post Modern Landscape Opportunities

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/bill-dunford/new-views-of-ancient-martian.html

  172. egg permalink
    December 13, 2014 7:41 pm

    Gauguin by Vincent, green and red.

  173. December 13, 2014 9:08 pm

    image

  174. egg permalink
    December 13, 2014 10:02 pm

    *chuckle*

    William Dobell

  175. December 13, 2014 11:55 pm

    Just been attempting Turner-esque sky.

    image

  176. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 8:55 am

    Not bad for a first attempt. I’m doing Martian landscapes with a limited palette and might consider putting them up for your edification. What’s the drum?

  177. December 14, 2014 9:37 am

    Open yourself a Flickr account, upload some photos, then I’ll show you how to share them.

  178. December 14, 2014 10:09 am

    (Might put a painted ship upon the painted ocean.)

  179. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 11:03 am

    OK, I’ll talk to management about Flickr.

    ———

    Fishermen in a small rowing boat, as an incidental aspect close to the bottom of the canvas.

  180. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 11:30 am

    I’m on Flickr and await further instructions.

  181. December 14, 2014 12:02 pm

    Click on the photo you want to post. When it opens in a new window there’ll be four icons towards the bottom right. Click on the curved rightward arrow (the third one, usually). A dialogue box will open up. Copy the link and paste it here.

  182. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 12:31 pm

    Thanks, I have a little work on so will get to it after lunch

  183. December 14, 2014 1:13 pm

    (If you’re taking pictures with an iPhone, it’s easiest to upload to Flickr straight from the phone.)

  184. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 1:35 pm

    mars.jpg

  185. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 1:54 pm

    With Apple I have a different environment. I have uploaded two pics from Flikr, but need …. more help.

  186. December 14, 2014 2:13 pm

    If you’ve got your pics on to your Flickr photostream, then just follow my earlier instructions.

  187. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 3:20 pm

    I finish work in a couple of hours and will try again then.

  188. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 7:19 pm

    Struggled with it, but no show. Your instructions did nothing for my apple system and I don’t know why.

  189. December 14, 2014 7:32 pm

    Give me your Flickr address and I’ll do it for you.

  190. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 7:45 pm

    I used the name Ted Jansz (he has been dead for 25 years) is that enough?

  191. December 14, 2014 7:49 pm

    Nope.

    “Oops! There are no matches for “Ted Jansz”.
    Please try refining your search.”

    Just open your page and copy and paste the address here. I’ll do the rest.

  192. December 14, 2014 7:50 pm

    For example, this is mine …

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/128855231@N07/

  193. December 14, 2014 8:10 pm

    Test

  194. December 14, 2014 8:29 pm

    If I thought it were appropriate, I’d post some Vincent Locke, but it ain’t, so I won’t…

  195. December 14, 2014 8:29 pm

    #appleshit

  196. December 14, 2014 8:30 pm

    #monopolisticallyunwieldybydesign

  197. December 14, 2014 8:32 pm

    “If I thought it were appropriate, I’d post some Vincent Locke, but it ain’t, so I won’t…”

    Go right ahead. Who’s to say what’s “appropriate”.

  198. egg permalink
    December 14, 2014 8:41 pm

    I was about to put it up when I realised management’s name was on it and its been given the thumbs down.

    bugger

  199. December 14, 2014 8:47 pm

    ” Who’s to say what’s “appropriate”.”

    Self?

    I’m an artist/illustrator who has faded with age/time constraints…I used to be creative.

    Even so, I’d be reluctant to put my illustrations ‘out there’ because people have a way of seeing things through their own filter of outrage.
    Check out a few contemporary gore-slam covers & be offended.

    I see it as trying to provoke outrage by articulating the (harmless) mindseye…

  200. December 14, 2014 8:49 pm

    You could open an anonymous account, you know.

  201. December 14, 2014 8:49 pm

    Sorry, egg…I hate apple, not you. We aren’t enemies…although I can see how I may have projected as much.

  202. December 14, 2014 8:49 pm

    Haha…like ‘public toilet’?…

  203. December 14, 2014 8:51 pm

    “I’m an artist/illustrator who has faded with age/time constraints…I used to be creative.”

    Interesting. If you ever feel the urge again, I’d love to have a look.

  204. December 14, 2014 8:51 pm

    I don’t ‘hate’ apple either…I just intensely dislike it.

    I’d heard that every iphone is forged in the bone dust of ten thousand (more worthy than human life) Jack Russells…

  205. December 14, 2014 8:54 pm

    Yeah, I can see how that was ambiguous. Both you and egg could open anonymous Flickr accounts (meaning no connection to your real personal info). It might be interesting to view the deviant art eminating from the water closet.

  206. December 14, 2014 8:55 pm

    “Interesting. If you ever feel the urge again, I’d love to have a look.”

    I’m quite serious, I think I alluded to this half a decade ago (or so) on these forums, but thought better of it (luckily)…

    I have drawn things (loose) people have had tattooed on them…but most of what I’ve drawn is/was designed with provocation in mind. I’ve been a subversive for a loooong time…you can’t imagine.

  207. December 14, 2014 8:56 pm

    Hah…water closet…

    I knew you were like Carson!

  208. December 14, 2014 8:56 pm

    *emanating

  209. December 14, 2014 9:01 pm

    Johnny Carson?

    (Water Closet (WC) is what they call it in France, I didn’t know why till I visited the Palace of Versailles. Louis the whatever used to shit in a can, taken away by his lackies, no matter how luxurious his bathroom. The english invented the plumbed toilet, known as a water closet. Louis couldn’t wait to get one installed. The term must have spread from there.)

  210. December 14, 2014 9:06 pm

    Mr Moseley! You cannot put the poo with the pudding wine!

  211. December 14, 2014 10:57 pm

  212. December 14, 2014 11:18 pm

    The Strain…?

    Having sent sole progeny there, at considerable worthy cost, in the next couple of months, I’m highly unlikely to ever enjoy the privilege myself,…still not wasted

  213. egg permalink
    December 15, 2014 8:49 am

    It may eventually turn out that I have to take the stick down town to a chat room and pay a couple of bucks.

  214. egg permalink
    December 16, 2014 2:45 pm

    Tony the Marxists have put up a thread called ‘Art for arts sake’ and they have narrowed it to Chinese art, just sayin’.

  215. December 17, 2014 1:54 am

  216. December 17, 2014 2:16 am

  217. December 17, 2014 2:47 am

    “That is the great thing. I mean, you know, the new technology is not just about multi-million mega-buck, um, movies. It’s about the fact that there is this, um, high-quality. cheap equipment that people can get their hands on and get straight out there, Young film-makers don’t have to worry about laboratory costs, about getting hold of film stock, hiring expensive cameras. Get hold of techmology, get out there and make a movie. And it’s great, basically.”
    ~ Mike Leigh.

  218. egg permalink
    December 17, 2014 6:17 am

    Indeed, its an extraordinary situation, but the film maker is still largely dependent on others being part of his venture in one capacity or another. Whereas a writer or artist is allowed to be an isolate, my preferred option.

  219. December 17, 2014 8:27 am

  220. egg permalink
    December 17, 2014 3:11 pm

    **cuckle**

  221. egg permalink
    December 17, 2014 7:29 pm

    Wang Niandong

  222. December 18, 2014 3:14 am

    Black candles dance to an ovreture…but I am drawn past their flickering lure…

    Queen of Winter, Throned…

  223. December 18, 2014 9:39 pm

  224. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    December 18, 2014 9:54 pm

    Religious art has its place. Borja (Spain) is reporting a tourist boom as people flock to see the restoration!!

  225. December 19, 2014 7:45 pm

  226. December 19, 2014 7:53 pm

  227. egg permalink
    December 19, 2014 9:19 pm

    Lijun

    Bald Men

  228. egg permalink
    December 19, 2014 9:26 pm

    Fu Baoshi

    See the difference in styles, this was done during the Maoist era.

  229. December 19, 2014 9:27 pm

  230. egg permalink
    December 19, 2014 9:30 pm

    oops..

    Fu Baoshi

    Looks like I’ll be up tomorrow, met a man who knows Mac, but we could do with some fresh fred.

  231. December 19, 2014 9:31 pm

  232. December 19, 2014 9:46 pm

    #I’llridewithalbatraoz’

  233. egg permalink
    December 19, 2014 10:20 pm

    Down at the barricades with the Marxists I have been accepted, through the use of few words. Brevity brevity, all is brevity.

  234. egg permalink
    December 19, 2014 10:47 pm

    Howard Arkley

    mg.aasd.com.au/32133292.jpg

  235. December 19, 2014 11:36 pm

  236. December 20, 2014 12:43 pm

    H2O

  237. December 20, 2014 1:14 pm

    You’re up, egg! Interesting work.

  238. December 20, 2014 1:22 pm

    There’s a way to post your pictures in a higher res/larger size.

    H2O

  239. December 20, 2014 1:23 pm

    (Except it didn’t work.)

  240. egg permalink
    December 20, 2014 2:57 pm

    Yeah I’m still working on that.

  241. December 20, 2014 6:17 pm

    Better upload some more pics, egg. Your Flickr photostream looks a bit bare with just the one example.

    (Now we’ve gotta get toiletboss to reveal his satanic etchings.)

  242. December 20, 2014 6:43 pm

  243. December 20, 2014 6:58 pm

  244. December 20, 2014 6:59 pm

    Hey, reb, can we please have a new Arts thread. This one is taking a very looong time to load. Thanks.

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